Hey, there! Log in / Register

MBTA now says new Orange Line cars won't go into service until early spring

WBUR reports the first brand-new Orange Line car since the 1980s won't start taking passengers until sometime in March. The T says the delay - it had originally hoped to have at least one new train running by last month - is to thoroughly test the French-made systems that will link the trains to the line's signalling system. The delay is just for the very first train - it should not affect delivery of future cars from the Springfield factory assembling the cars from mostly Chinese components, the T says.

Topics: 
Free tagging: 
Ad:

Comments

You need to brace people for shocking and wholly unexpected news such as this

up
Voting closed 25

March?
Buddy,
Try
August

up
Voting closed 44

try 2020.
this is becoming a joke..............

up
Voting closed 8

Why did I just get a strange uneasy sense that I'm gonna get a strange uneasy sense when I ride these new trains?

up
Voting closed 5

But! They didn't say what year!

The Twitterverse is rightfully skeptical …

up
Voting closed 9

Did the T fail to tell everyone that when one of the new trains was laid up at Wellington for two days all the doors were left open. Then it poured out. The train filled with water.

I work with morons.

up
Voting closed 17

I'd rather the trains be ready than be rolled out and have problems (I'm looking at you, Green Line Type 8s.)

And if people are looking for "world class" examples, I will once again note how Transport for London delayed the opening of the Elizabeth Line came surprising close to its completion and, well, most projects in that city to the southwest of us.

up
Voting closed 8

is to thoroughly test the French-made systems that will link the trains to the line's signalling system.

I recall seeing a completed new Orange Line car or two on this site last fall or earlier. I believe it was being tested and providing driver training. Does this delay mean that they discovered a flaw showing the new trains incompatible? It wouldn't be the first or worst example of government incompetence, so I wouldn't be surprised if they had to re-wire the new trains or the old signalling system. I went with 2020 in the poll, I wish 2020+ was an option.

FWIW, Channel-4 news has a slightly different spin from the T, saying that "third party testing" of the new cars is needed, no specific mention of the signalling system.

up
Voting closed 6

The T's Red/Orange/Blue signal system has been around for what, 30 years?

Why can't the trains have the same onboard hardware the T already uses? Proven reliability and parts commonality should be the goal. When you get a brand new untested product, that's how you run into trouble.

When Toyota designs the 2020 Camry, they don't throw away the plans for the 2019 Camry and start from scratch. They keep what works, and change what doesn't, and many of the parts will be interchangeable. That's how you build a highly reliable and affordable vehicle.

up
Voting closed 1

Because you can't get parts for the old system probably. Because it's 40 years old.

And the new system will allow for shorter headways.

up
Voting closed 2

They won't be basing the 2020 Camry on the 1980 Camry.

Still, I'll take the 40 year old MBTA system over the 100+ year old signaling system used by a certain transit system about 200 miles from Boston. But they can still replace it. I want the new system.

up
Voting closed 4

Think about that the next time you're in stop and go train traffic for several stations approaching Park Street or Alewife at rush hour.

The Red Line chokes daily on 5 minute headways. Meanwhile, NYC successfully runs 3 minute headways on each track, with 1920s technology.

up
Voting closed 5

From what I read, they aren't as successful with operating as we are in Boston. I mean, if having a 15 MPH speed limit while having trains stacked up is your definition of success, sure. I mean, they are still using color signals on their system.

I'm still looking for London's version of success. They are running trains on the Victoria Line at 90 second intervals at good speeds because they were able to update their signaling system. London is in the 21st century, while New York has barely entered the 20th.

up
Voting closed 1

As I said before, have you ever sat in stop-and-go train traffic from before Kendall, over the Longfellow, to Park Street? And this is on 5-minute headways, under everyday conditions when there's no broken down train or signal problem.

Have you ever sat in the 10-minute conga line of trolleys approaching Boylston?

I'm not sure why you think we're more successful at train throughput and speeds than we are. They have 3-minute headways. We don't. We have major jams getting into terminals like Alewife every single rush hour. They don't.

Plus they have a program to REMOVE unnecessarily conservative signal settings, to speed up service when it's safe to do so: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/10/nyregion/new-york-subway-delay.html . That's not even on our radar.

up
Voting closed 1

Says who?

Cab signals are used on dozens of railroads and transit systems in North America. Standard parts should be available, without having to resort to an untested reinvention of the wheel.

up
Voting closed 3