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Remember when Howards took over from M.E. Nichols?

Old street scene in old Boston

If so, you should have no trouble placing this photo provided by the folks at the Boston City Archives. See it larger.

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Why doesn't Boston City Archives do the better looking into historic preservation of City Documents?... for example, a) the full Stenographic Record of Public Meetings of Boston City Council and the b) Dictionary File with Shortcuts for making the Steno Record !

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.

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Than the unexpurgated minutes of Dapper O'Neil and David Scondras going at it...

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a) What's the historical perspective of their accomplishments for their communities' constituencies? b) Where are they now?... as community leaders there were good works of both as well as notoriety.

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Madam Wu provides generous, comprehensive notes. http://michelleforboston.com/notes/

WGBH generously records and captions all Council meetings and hearings.
https://www.cityofboston.gov/citycouncil/cc_video_library.asp

ETA: I almost forgot, about 30% of City Council meeting time is used by the Clerk to recite communications from His Honor, name new City Appointees, and blah, blah, blah. It's all written in the agenda http://meetingrecords.cityofboston.gov/sirepub/mtgviewer.aspx?meetid=334...

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United Nations General Assembly? United States Senate? United States House of Representatives?

City Council public meeting on Council stenography contract bids
Michelle Wu was live.
September 7 2016 at 11:46am
https://www.facebook.com/michelleforboston/videos/1132778646815392/

Massachusetts Senate Clerk Bill Welch tel 617-722-1276 https://malegislature.gov/People/ClerksOffice/Senate and Massachusetts House of Representatives Clerk Steve James tel 617-722-2356 https://malegislature.gov/People/ClerksOffice/House have Records of Public Sessions and and Records of Committees' Public Hearings.

Massachusetts State Archives https://www.sec.state.ma.us/arc/ and State Library http://www.mass.gov/anf/research-and-tech/oversight-agencies/lib/ have historical Records of Public Sessions and historical Records of Committees' Public Hearings of Massachusetts Senate and Massachusetts House of Representatives.

Full Transcripts are available of Captioning on the City Council, Senate, House video transmissions for ESL English as Second Language folks, for hard of hearing folks, for deaf folks, for all.

Full Transcripts are useful for greater civic participation, interacting with Councilors and Legislators. Remarks are available from the Public Sessions and Public Meetings. Folks can send comment, feedback, suggestions, questions with the actual Remarks a Councilor or Legislator. It's 2016. Technology and software make greater civic participation available from even a branch public library computer.

The ease of learning Stenographic technology/software makes it available widely. Anyone can take a stenographic record of any public meeting. In the old days, reporters/journalists like Mark Twain used stenography.

It would be interesting if more folks posted independent steno records of public meetings online !
http://www.openstenoproject.org/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopist

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Does not provide them either.

Look, the latter should be more important to you, as you are a resident of the Commonwealth, but you don't live in Boston. Leave Boston to the Bostonians.

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uneducated guess.

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A quick guess from a quick Google search would be Ann st. aka North St

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70-86 Main St, Charlestown. Around 1900.

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I love those railings on the roof. I wonder what those were for? Maybe there was some sort of rooftop patio or something.

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Similar railings atop an old home, are called a "widow's walk".

Definition:

A railed or balustraded platform built on a roof, originally in early New England houses, typically for providing an unimpeded view of the sea.

Origin:

1930s: with reference to its use as a viewpoint for the hoped-for return of a seafaring husband.

The above information is via Google, however, I have seen widow's walks on older homes that were built in the 18th and 19th centuries. They can be seen on some colonial-era homes in Salem.

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Thanks for playing folks! This photo is from Charlestown. It was taken on January 19, 1900 and shows the west side of Main Street, just north of Monument Avenue.

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