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Boston school opening pushed back to Sept. 21

WBZ reports on the latest BPS school re-opening plan, which calls for schools to open Sept. 21 for grades 1-12 and Sept. 23 for pre-K.

The newest proposal calls for a hybrid model, in which students would spend part of the week in school, part in home, but with a parental option to keep kids home fulltime.

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Comments

I guess employees will have understanding bosses who let them stay home when the kids are hybrid learning.?

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there isn't going to be a solution that satisfies a majority of people.

it's been said a thousand million times before, but that work and safety are mutually exclusive in this time is probably a call to rethink how we approach the government's role in society.

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All solutions are flawed. I do wish this hadnt been pushed to the last minute as much, August-September is probably going to be a better time for a hybrud solution than winter, so unfortunate that we lose that month.

We ideally should start planning for school over the summer the next couple of years, but not sure that is tenable given teacher contracts and the impending budget disaster.

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I guess employees will have understanding bosses who let them stay home when the kids are hybrid learning.?

I guess when people die of disease that was spread because schools reopened when they shouldn't have, they will have understanding surviving family members who forgive the folks who pressed for schools to reopen so they could go back to work, eh?

Whichever way you want to make that particular policy choice, you're going to hand an advantage to some people at the expense of some others.

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.....who pressed for schools to reopen so they could go back to work, eh?

But if they are not operating every day people who are employed will have to figure it out, no?

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how the hell are our poor teachers supposed to do that

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Every parent I know is both asking that but also understanding that it's going to be subpar learning experience for students and teachers this year.

It's like the NBA - it's happening and better than nothing but I miss the real thing.

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If I'm not mistaken, grades 1-8 doesn't start hybrid until the 28th and 9-12 until October 5th.

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Our kids will now be known as Generation Education Covid 19.

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Between work and home schooling their kids? The Cleavers.

This has been a problem for decades. Too bad we sent generations of kids off to crap schools because we decided to have a giant society-wide bidding war for shelter instead. Too bad hundreds of thousands will die for us to learn this lesson.

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What does this even mean?

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The Cleavers inhabited a very, very narrow slice of the historical timeline.

Prior to the Industrial Revolution and urbanization, pretty much everybody worked. Farming was still the most common occupation in the USA as recently as the 1900 census -- maybe 1910; i haven't looked it up recently. In a farm family, everyone worked, although not everyone went into town to a job and got a paycheck.

Post WWII, the USA saw a combination of the economic surplus created by industrialization, with the "last man standing" advantage of the rest of the world's industrial economies having been destroyed by the war, and a government that wasn't hell-bent on concentrating all of this surplus at the very top. This surplus and advantage was so massive that, for one unique period in history,

  • Professional jobs were, in fact, literally "9-to-5"
  • The average white suburban middle class family could thrive nicely on one salary, creating the role of "full-time homemaker"
  • American companies could thrive and prosper, even with the entire managerial / professional class drunk a lot of the time (Mad Men, among other period pieces, highlights this.)

That wasn't the norm. The notion that 1955-1970 was some kind of historical economic norm from which we ran off the rails in the 1970s and beyond, the notion that it's something that we could conceivably get back to, just completely misses the story. That period was a brief and strange anomaly.

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The "last man standing" effect, combined with an enormous wealth in natural resources, fueled that prosperity. It was a one time thing. We need to find other ways, and likely other definitions of "prosperity" as well.

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Which means the Cleaveresque lifestyle of one income supporting the family existed in places like Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago around the time of the American Civil War. The cost of living in cities was predicated on a single income by and large supporting a household. As we live in a city that has not had large scale farming within its boundaries since, well, founding, I believe we can ignore the ways of farm life.

Will has a point. Since the 1970s we have set up a system wherein having both parents out working is the norm, with the kids off at school from the age of 5 until adulthood (and beyond in most cases.) This pandemic is not supporting that system.

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but why should the family dynamic be the thing to change? couldn’t we aspire to a social model that supports parents who wish to pursue careers outside the home?

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So perhaps the idea that children have a place to go while parents are at work should be developed. Perhaps we could have the people looking after them reading them subjects that could help them down the road.

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Which means the Cleaveresque lifestyle of one income supporting the family existed in places like Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago around the time of the American Civil War.

Which is why there were no women and children working in the mills through the 19th century and into the 20th. Because one income supported the family. *eyeroll*

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The girls in the mills by and large worked there until they had children. As for the children in the mills, that is kind of immaterial to the discussion, but that practice went out of fashion when the children were mandated to attend schoolhouses 5 days a week. Even the poorest families had to put up with that until junior was old enough to leave school.

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What's more of a risk, an adult riding on a crowded train or bus with not one MBTA representative doing anything about all the violators or being a kid having to take the same train or bus to get to school ? Nobody knows.

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The push to go back really is to support kids whose parents who have to return to the workplace or are otherwise in a bind. Has your school asked what you need and not on an anonymous survey?

I’m a single mom and fortunately can work remotely. I expect my child to be remote as well, until we can be vaccinated. This is our plan.

Small scale solutions build trust and camaraderie.
Solutions should be run by principals who know their populations on a school by school basis.
Principals should be asking teachers to set up grade level parent conferences, even if in large group calls. I want to hear.
Teachers’ expectations and needs need to be heard. Teachers are the pros and should be ready.
Wouldn’t it be great if we (parents) knew? Parents are happy to pitch in when teachers ask. Just ask for our help. I’m happy to sit in a weekly meeting to go over curriculum expectations for the week.
How much communication have you had with your child’s school lately? Is there any?

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