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Curley School's first day back to end with a Covid-19 vaccination clinic

The Curley School in Jamaica Plain is scheduled to re-open for classes tomorrow for the first time in ten days, after school and Boston public-health officials ordered it shut to try to get a handle on a Covid-19 outbreak.

The Boston Public Health Commission will hold a vaccination clinic for school staffers and eligible students at the end of the day, between 3 and 4 p.m., at 40 Pershing Rd.

The clinic will then open up to all Boston residents, ages 12 and up, who need a shot or booster.

The city will run a similar clinic between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. on Tuesday at the Philbrick School on Philbrick Road in Roslindale for Boston residents 12 and up.

Public Health Commission vaccination clinics.

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Comments

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BPD should drive their ice cream truck over and give the kids a free cup after getting their shot.

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They should get rid of that ridiculous hunk of copaganda.

(Not to mention that the term has gotten dated, and most kids now don't know the term "hoodsie cup," they assume cops are referring to folks in the hood that way, and they don't appreciate it. My white boomer ass has explained the origin to several of my kids' friends and my work kids, as well as listened to their concerns that, well, just no.)

Not to mention that the term has gotten dated, and most kids now don't know the term "hoodsie cup,"

Well, since you did mention it, Hoodsies are still sold in most groceries, and they seem to sell pretty well. I'd be interested in seeing the source of your claim about "most kids'" knowledge.

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I'm sure there are a lot of products at grocery stores that swaths of people aren't aware of. I'm sure I don't recognize the name of a lot of items sold at most grocery stores. I've not ever bought them or noticed them at the stores here, though they're probably there. It's been a really long time since I've seen them at kids' events, and usually those have been the generic ones with just the company name in plain text on the lid. I feel like most events in the past 10 years or so have succumbed so much to food moralizing anyway and give kids things that have the optics the food moralizers prefer.

I did say what the source is -- that my kids, their friends, and kids I work with will see the copaganda van that says "Operation Hoodsie Cup" and depending on the particular kid, will make some crack about the cops trying to be down, or say that it isn't appropriate the cops are calling them hoodsies.

It's risky to make claims about what "most" of a population knows, based on a small, non-random sample of that group. More risky still to not base it on actually surveying even that sample*, but going by a pun that they seem to make in response to a marginally-related situation.

* I'm assuming you didn't actually ask all those kids if they knew what a Hoodsie is.

It's risky to make claims about what "most" of a population knows

Didn't you pretty much do the same thing?

I made no claims about what anyone knows. I said the things are still widely sold, and that they sell well. I base this on observation that they are frequently sold out in the places I've been that carry them. None of that says anything about anyone's knowledge but mine.

Here's the entire comment that you seem to think says something about what kids know:

Well, since you did mention it, Hoodsies are still sold in most groceries, and they seem to sell pretty well. I'd be interested in seeing the source of your claim about "most kids'" knowledge.

Not one word about what I think kids know. Please stop reading things into my comments that aren't there.

I'd be interested in seeing the source of YOUR belief that all the kids seem to know what a hoodsie cup is. It's just not the dominant form of ice cream that it used to be.

...YOUR belief that all the kids seem to know what a hoodsie cup is.

Did I say that? Why no, I did not. If you find someone who did say that, you can ask them.

We have a 16 and 14 year who both grew up eating hoodsie cups and are very aware of what they are.
I can't speak for other kids but I think most Boston kids have heard of hoodsie cups.

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I always assumed the pun was intentional.

Anyway, my suggestion was only because the city owns the Ice Cream truck and it's nice to give kids ice cream as a treat for doing something good. It had nothing to do with the police beyond the fact they own the truck.

the city owns the Ice Cream truck...It had nothing to do with the police beyond the fact they own the truck

The city, or the police?