Hey, there! Log in / Register

Ferry service between East Boston and downtown starts Monday

The T announced today it will start running ferries between Lewis Mall in East Boston and Long Wharf downtown on Monday.

The state Legislature ponied up the money needed to resume what had initially started as a temporary service last spring when the Blue Line was shut for tunnel work. About 1,750 people a day took the roughly 10-minute ride across the harbor.

The new service, considered a pilot that will run through the end of November, halt for the winter, then restart March 1 and run until the summer, unless the legislature approves more money. According to the T:

On weekday mornings, 11 trips will depart Lewis Wharf every 30 minutes beginning at 7 AM and 10 return trips will depart from Long Wharf every 30 minutes starting at 7:15 AM. On weekday afternoons and evenings, ferries will depart Lewis Mall every 30 minutes beginning at 2:30 PM with the last trip at 7:30 PM. Trips from Long Wharf to Lewis Mall will leave every 30 minutes beginning at 2:15 PM with the last trip at 7:45 PM.

On weekend mornings, eight trips will depart Lewis Wharf every 30 minutes beginning at 9 AM, and seven return trips will depart from Long Wharf every 30 minutes beginning at 9:15 AM. On weekend afternoons and evenings, ferries will depart Lewis Wharf every 30 minutes beginning at 3:30 PM with the last trip departing at 8:30 PM. Twelve return trips will depart Long Wharf every 30 minutes beginning at 3:15 PM with the last ferry departing at 8:45 PM.

Fares will be $2.40 each way - $1.10 for reduced-fare riders. Riders can pay for fares at the Long Wharf ticket booth or on the mTicket app. Printed LinkPasses, commuter-rail zone and M7 passes will be accepted.

Neighborhoods: 
Topics: 

Ad:
Like the job UHub is doing? Consider a contribution. Thanks!

Comments

up
14

I wouldn't even mind Long Wharf, Lewis Wharf, Charlestown Navy Yard Ferry service circle.

up
15

During the Blue Line replacement service, it made taking a bike across the harbor much easier. Hopefully after the pilot it will be approved for permanent service.

up
21

The ferry service in particular will help bike riders during the hours when bikes aren't allowed on the Blue Line (weekdays inbound 7-9 am and outbound 4-6 pm).

up
14

there are no T employees to prevent you from taking your bike on the blue line. It has been happening a lot even one extremely crowded trains. It would just take one quick stop to cause a problem but the T doesn't worry about accidents, right?

up
10

I support allowing bikes on the train, but first we need a way to secure them once boarded. I have taken a bike on the Blue Line a couple of times, and once or twice on the Orange Line. It is awkward to say the least, and very difficult to control the bike from rolling or falling away from me as the train lurches and jerks its way to the next station. I do not think it is particularly safe without some sort of rack or mounting system. Los Angeles has such racks on every car, and they work really well, regardless of how crowded the train might be.

The MAX in Portland has numerous hooks for bikes and got them worked out about 20 years ago. The bikes go vertical and take up far less room.

up
10

Take take take.

I mean they have a bike. Why are they on the T? Go ride it.

up
10

Please show us your map. (I know how I'd do it, but it's very long and hazardous compared to a short T ride between two adjoining stops. Or a ferry ride, for that matter.)

up
12

Show us on the doll where the bad evil bike people hurt you.

Better yet, stand in the middle of I-93 when you do so no "entitled" cyclists will interfere with your pain.

up
12

I think you’re threatening me? Is that correct? Or you want me to die?

I mean if there’s ever been behavior warranting banning from a public forum, this is it. Adam?

is an extra 6.5 miles. That's far enough to keep a lot of people from choosing to bike.

up
10

A 7 a.m. departure from East Boston is too late for many who work in schools or hospitals - not that Boston has a lot of those...

up
11

Is kinda useless if you work at a school or hospital. Unless you were planning to walk over to Aquarium or State or Government Center and get on the subway. But in that case, wouldn't you just board at Maverick?

up
14

Is there another ticket booth on that side, or do you pay on the boat?

This one is already in operation.

https://seaportferry.com/schedule/

And is much more expensive, $5 one-way with no reduced senior or other fares.

Which is another option. The Seaport Ferry is free if you work for one of a few companies in that area but presumably those employees already know that.

It's been running for almost one year. It is free if one's employer is part of the ridership program. It is also open to the public for $5.00. It runs earlier in the morning than the T ferry.

It's been running for almost one year. It is free if one's employer is part of the ridership program. It is also open to the public for $5.00. It runs earlier in the morning than the T ferry.

Because the T, in all its idiocy, still can't figure out how to accept passes/fares stored on a CharlieCard with a mobile reader, over fifteen years after they rolled out contactless cards. So the large number of riders with LinkPasses on CharlieCards would have to buy a ticket at the ticket booth or through mTicket -- and that's just not worth it for a service with less than a third the frequency of the Blue Line.

up
22

U.K. Drug dealers have been using contactless payments since at least 2020. Why we can't do this on the commuter rail yet is beyond me.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/11126944/drug-dealers-pin-class-a-drugs/

God Save The King!