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Covid-19 hospitalization rate keeps going up

Massachusetts today had 917 people hospitalized for Covid-19, compared to 342 a month ago.

Number of people in the hospital due to Covid-19 each day.

Massachusetts today reported 917 people hospitalized with Covid-19, up from 885 yesterday - and up 168% from the 342 people reported on Oct. 19.

However, the number remains far below the peaks seen during the first surge in the spring - which hit its highest point at 3,542 on May 4 - despite an overall increase in the total number of new Covid-19 cases that is now comparable to the numbers we saw in late April,

Still, Gov. Baker recently ordered the re-opening of one of the state's field hospitals, at the DCU Center in Worcester, just in case numbers don't come down in December. Baker said yesterday he's worried about even more cases in December as people disregard public-health warnings and get together for Thanksgiving.

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I made the tough call tonight to not visit my parents for Thanksgiving. It's heartbreaking because my toddler has hardly seen my aging parents. It is heartbreaking for me and my parents, especially my mother. But it's the right thing to do to keep them safe and it's the right thing to do at a citizen of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

I urge you all to call and write your elected officials. We need leadership and more urgent action. If Congress won't act, Beacon Hill must. If Beacon Hill refuses, City Hall must. Pester you elected officials to provide any kind of economic relief, which will help workers and businesses make the right decisions.

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Pester you elected officials to provide any kind of economic relief, which will help workers and businesses make the right decisions.

Where will Beacon Hill get the money? The feds can print it, Massachusetts cannot.

Average age of death is 81.....so we need to protect the elderly, everyone else doesn’t have to fear.
End the fear mongering.

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Death is not the only severe consequence paid for contracting COVID; you either know that by now or are willfully ignorant/dishonest.

Sean here would have us over-capacity for hospital beds and have refrigerated morgue trucks lined down the block. 15% of Covid-positive college athletes—who, on average, are much younger than 81–showed signs of heart damage. This virus hospitalized the President of the United States and people have lost weeks of work/school from being sick. Our healthcare workers are beyond exhausted and the mental stress they are under is enormous.

Furthermore, there are numerous long-term side effects:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/long-term-effects.html

Saying “everyone else doesn’t have to fear” is dangerous lie.

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If Sean north shore can't stop posting these dangerous comments, he's earned a ban.

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He's wrong that people have nothing to fear -- 250,000 people have died due to complications from it. Even more people are dealing with long term affects, some which could be life long. So yes, everyone should fear COVID.

At the same time, it's wrong to pretend things haven't changed since it started to spread in February and March. At this point, the risk of death or longterm harm a vast number of people face is minimal. For most, the bigger risk is needing hospitalization for something unrelated and being turned away because the hospitals are full.

It's also wrong to pretend the huge increase in unemployment and related negative consequences of dealing with COVID is inconsequential. A huge percentage of the population has been hurt in trying (and failing) to mitigate the spread of COVID. That pain will last decades.

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It's also wrong to pretend the huge increase in unemployment and related negative consequences of dealing with COVID is inconsequential. A huge percentage of the population has been hurt in trying (and failing) to mitigate the spread of COVID. That pain will last decades.

But that isn't the fault of COVID/public health measures to contain it. That is the fault of the Federal Government.

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long term effects for a disease that's been around for less than a year..................how doe we know what this disease will do to a body in 10 years? Wouldn't we only know if something is permanent if we checked in with the person when they were eon their deathbed years from now?

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If you clicked the link you would have read the above sentence. Also, to repeat myself and many others, death and being on one’s deathbed is not the only severe consequence of this disease.

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Just because we haven't seen this exact disease before, doesn't mean we haven't seen similar diseases. And if we know people who have suffered from similar diseases (but survived) have had long-term health effects, we can assume that the same will be true here, especially when we see the same short-term effects etc. Obviously there's lots of complicating factors, and every case has its own unique circumstances, but it's not like we're operating on absolutely no knowledge here.

It's like planting a tree - technically, we don't know for sure what the tree will look like in ten years, but we can get a pretty good idea by comparing it to similar trees, and by tracking how it's progressing as it grows.

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Even younger people who've come down with Covid-19 and survived have suffered permanent heart, lung, and even neurological damage. The people who claim that younger people are immune to coming down with Covid-19 are either quite naive or willfully ignorant.

Na. I'm down to not get Coronavirus.

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Unless you are capable of making valid medical and epidemiological arguments, I suggest you either learn the actual population science or GTFTH.

You are only making yourself look incredibly and willfully stupid with your ignorant statements.

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It is criminally irresponsible to spread this kind of misinformation, and wrong to provide it with a forum.

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How is he a criminal? Is having a different opinion a violation of the law?

So how do we do that exactly?
You cant unless you protect yourself first.
This cavalier attitude towards deaths pisses me off.
Wear a mask. Stay apart. The life you save may be yours, your loved one or mine.

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Nobody of any age is immune to becoming severely ill from, dying of, or even ending up with a damaged heart, lungs, or nervous system as a result of Covid-19.

But I can't get together with family. This does not make sense.

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People who are "essential workers", that's who.

Your getting together with family exponentially raises the risks for the people who stock supermarkets and will have to tend to your family members in COVID wards.

Do you really want to go through what this family went through before the risks were known? Seriously? https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/30/nyregion/coronavirus-fusco-family-nj....

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Who is riding the bus or train? People who are "essential workers", that's who.

Anyone riding the T during this time can tell you that this is flat out wrong.

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can you tell whether the other people on the train are essential workers? Would love to see your Sherlock Holmes / ESP skills here.

Bus/train--shorter amount of time (however long your commute is, 30-60 mins let's say each way), wearing masks, hopefully distanced if space allows.

Family inside--not masked, eating in close quarters, longer amount of time together (over 24 hours if you're staying there, 4-6 hours if just there for the day).

It's actually pretty clear which is more dangerous.

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Also the air is partly refreshed at every stop when the bus/train doors open.

Vast majority are celebrating with their households only: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/20/upshot/how-epidemiologists-spending-t...

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Zoom Thanksgiving
or
ICU Christmas

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... for a number of reasons:

  1. You don't have to have Covid to be affected by hospital overcrowding. Feel that pain in your lower right abdomen? Your appendix is about to explode. Better hope you can get in and get it removed.
  2. It's not just the space - it's the staffing. The less time an overextended nurse has to spend with you, the less chance you have for an effective recovery from whatever you may have.
  3. The stress on healthcare workers is enormous. Talk to some people working ICU and covid units. They work their asses off, but severe stress affects job performance.
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I really feel for all of them. They are working so hard, with long hours and putting themselves and their families at risk. And we're making it harder for them, not following social distancing rules and mask-wearing. It really sucks.

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A declaration that calls for protecting the elderly and letting everybody else go free ranging again. It's been tried in Sweden. It didn't work. So please don't waste your time.

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Has our fish themed Q-Anon senior citizen chosen not to post lately or been banished?

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Because he's on a ventilator?

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One thing to consider when looking at hospitalizations, deaths, and new infections now compared to the Spring is that it is estimated that many many more people had the virus than were ever tested in the Spring. It looks like our death rate is much lower now but that does not account for what is probably a much more accurate measure of new infections each day because of widespread testing.

The death count will continue to go up as infections go up. The virus is not somehow far less deadly, we just have a more accurate measure of who has the virus.

Because MA already managed to infect and kill a large chunk of its most vulnerable population this spring. The normal population of nursing home residents in MA is around 40,000. So far, there have been 26,800 cases in nursing home residents and workers, with 6,675 deaths. Granted, not all cases have been in residents, but it's likely at least half of nursing home residents in MA have already had Covid and either died or recovered.