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Man opens fire on Rowes Wharf with a flare gun, attacks responding cops with uncapped hypodermic needles, police say

Rowes Wharf under attack

Surveillance video via BPD.

Boston Police report a South Boston man is at a local hospital for treatment and waiting arraignment on charges he fired several flares at Rowes Wharf, causing damage to both the Boston Harbor Hotel and boats docked there and for the hypodermic needles he threw at responding officers, one of whom was stabbed by one of them after the man had been cuffed.

Police report officers responded to the water side of the hotel around 8 p.m. on Saturday on reports somebody was shooting flares at the Rowes Wharf docks.

Officers observed the suspect, later identified as a 35-year-old male from South Boston, standing on top of a cargo container lighting incendiary devices while yelling threatening statements. Upon seeing the approaching officers, the suspect became increasingly agitated and began throwing various items toward them including several uncapped hypodermic needles. Despite the officers’ attempts to verbally de-escalate the situation, the suspect refused to come down and then began to stab himself in the arm with what appeared to be a hypodermic needle. Officers quickly climbed atop the shipping container and attempted to help the man down, but he immediately became physically combative and a struggle ensued. After the man was placed in handcuffs, one of the officers felt a sharp pain which appeared to be from one of the uncapped hypodermic needles thrown by the subject.

Once released from the hospital, the man, whom police did not name, will face arraignment on charges of assault and battery on a police officer, vandalism, trespassing and disturbing the peace, police say, adding that the officer stuck by the needle was immediately rushed to a local hospital for treatment.

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Comments

He stuck an officer with a needle he threw while cuffed???

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Perfect example of why police statements shouldn't just be parroted out and taken at face value.

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We are talking a profession that went to great pains to warn parents about "candy fentenyl" and "edibles" prior to Halloween, with no documented incidents before or after.

Also a profession where hysterical fainting in the presence of what might be fentanyl in a bag is becoming a hackneyed trope.

Doesn't exactly engender trust.

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He threw some, and had some still on his person. After he was cuffed an officer got stuck by one of the ones on his person...

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But that's not what the police report says:

After the man was placed in handcuffs, one of the officers felt a sharp pain which appeared to be from one of the uncapped hypodermic needles thrown by the subject.

If your interpretation is accurate, it should say:

...which appeared to be from one of the uncapped hypodermic needles of the type thrown by the subject.

I care about nitpicking police reports because more often then not they are hagiographic reports of police actions (not to mention the ones that are out and out lies). Restoring trust in law enforcement can start with written reports that at least seem accurate.

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And not even written by a police officer it’s written by some NU PhD student.

Not that that matters.

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After all, it's got their name on it and says its the official website of the Boston Police Department, so you'd think they'd have some control over its content.

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About it. I’m only saying it’s not a report that has any legal significance

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We're talking about "can we trust the public reports that the police puts out to be truthful and accurate" - and if the cops are going to immediately turn to "well, we don't even write the things" it sounds like the answer is no, we can't.

Next time I'll make sure the BPD has the type of needle that was used and the Blood Type of the officer and how much heroin was in that needle. The point is the fungwahs of the world will never be satisfied so there is no point listening to them if this is what they care about.

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It does not matter who writes it if the BPD puts it out.

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he immediately became physically combative and a struggle ensued. After the man was placed in handcuffs, one of the officers felt a sharp pain which appeared to be from one of the uncapped

He struggled with officers. He didn't have to throw anything to hit one during that. And it's not at all unusual if one of the officers was poked during the struggle, and didn't notice it until afterwards. That's what adrenaline is for.

Even while cuffed, he'd be within arm's reach of officers, and could have jabbed one. It's not like cuffs immobilize your arms.

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But it sounds more like in the struggle to subdue the guy, the officer was stuck by one of the needles that were tossed all over.

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I think this one one-ups the Roche bros torcher on the insanity factor.

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What do I have? Flares... hypodermics. Okay, I'm off.

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Book an outdoor venue and charge money for this crazy.

Or just invite the neighborhood: https://www.vice.com/en/article/jgpkw4/rotisserie-chicken-guy-interview

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because wow, yeah, that sounds like a case where I might feel OK about the use of lethal force. (Depending on where he's aiming those things.)

Fingers crossed that the syringe in question didn't have anything nasty on it.

Just when you think it cannot get any weirder in the Seaport District something like this happens.

"Love that dirty water, Boston your my home."

;-)