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Senate passes police reform bill

No chokeholds, independent oversight board and certification of officers, WBZ reports. Two of the no votes in the 4 a.m. tally were from Boston: Nick Collins and Mike Rush (West Roxbury).

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Comments

He seems to like the status quo especially when it comes to construction or unions.

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Voting closed 27

A rep from West Roxbury voting no, well... no shit.

But in Collins district that vote should be fatal to his career.

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Voting closed 31

He acts in the best interests of one segment of his district. If candidates run and people get out and vote in proportion to diversity of the district, he would be out. And there could be someone in who actually represents the needs and concerns of the whole district.

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Whether you support or oppose the legislation to pass this bill at 4AM without a public hearing doesn't pass the smell test.

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Voting closed 47

The consensus among many, many, many officers is that they are done. That this job is no longer worth risking your life, property, or family’s well being anymore. I’m not saying I necessarily feel that way, but it’s what the vast majority are feeling right now.

I’m personally very conflicted. My sense of duty and the oath I took is conflicting with my fear of being falsely accused of something and jeopardizing my children’s future. And I know some will say that if I’m doing the job right I have nothing to worry about - but that has not been my personal experience, as I have been falsely accused in the past.

I don’t know if a bigger crime wave is coming (we are experiencing one right now), but I am afraid a lot of police officers are going to take a huge step back and that is going to be overwhelmingly felt to the detriment of Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan: the communities that need them the most right now.

I’m sure I will get some responses that will label us all as killers and abusive, but the fact of the matter is that inner city communities in Boston have been dealing with an extremely violent past few weeks and the police are one of the very few trying to restore order on a daily basis.

- a Boston Cop

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Voting closed 61

Your job is less dangerous than that of pizza delivery drivers, farmers, loggers, electricians, construction workers, lineman, garbage pickup or tax drivers.

When one of you stubs a toe you get a month long paid vacation and a parade.

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Voting closed 68

I mean, I believe cops are pissed because they're finally facing some largely justified scrutiny for their behavior. I just don't believe anyone other than those with sufficient years banked to retire on the public's dime will leave the highest paying, most secure government job anyone could ever have.

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Voting closed 66

I don’t either. And I’m not planning to go, I still have several more years left. But I do fear that the quality of recruits is going to either plummet or be non-existent.

It is a very well paying job that attracts a lot of people who should never be cops. I’m just afraid that the kind of person who should be a cop is second guessing themselves right now if this is truly what they want to do. Or the person who shouldn’t be a cop is the only one signing up to be - and that’s a recipe for more disaster.

I hope I’m wrong, and I very well could be (wouldn’t be the first time). But the fear is there and very palpable among officers, with the most disgruntled questioning if they should even bother leaving the parking lots.

- a Boston Cop

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Voting closed 16

I think, in the narrow literal sense, you're right: most cops are not going to "leave" (quit) their overpayed jobs. But that's not what the original poster (cop) said: he predicted they'd "take a huge step back"... i.e. keep their heads down, stay in their cruisers, not do much out in the streets where they're needed. And he's also right that the chief victims of that pull-back will be the majority of law-abiding citizens of those neighborhoods.

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Voting closed 16

don't want to be "falsely accused"? don't turn off your body cam unless its to take a piss/shit.

don't want to be "falsely accused"? don't stand idly by when your fellow officers doing horrific shit. restore public faith in the idea of due process.

if either of those are too hard to undertake, perhaps you're in the wrong highly paid, generously benefited, and wildly generously pensioned field of work. yeah, occasionally the job has danger. but it was a voluntary profession to join. you weren't drafted to be a cop. the possible risks weren't hidden from you.

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Those cops should quit. As a Boston tax payer I’ll gladly take the $300K in annual savings. These whiny babies need to realize that actual adults are scrutinized for the jobs they are paid to do.

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And I know some will say that if I’m doing the job right I have nothing to worry about - but that has not been my personal experience, as I have been falsely accused in the past.

Try not being a cop and banking on "if... then nothing to worry about." There's no thin blue line protecting the rest of us.

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1) how long have you been on the job?

2) how many bad cops have you personally helped to take off the street, e.g., by your testimony or reporting?

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Voting closed 27

1) Just shy of 17 years total.

2) Zero. In my 17 years (see answer one), I’ve only really seen one instance where I thought a Boston officer was too aggressive conducting an arrest. We pulled him aside, scolded him, and told him never to do it again. I’m sure there’s an abundance of cops being too aggressive, but I can only speak to my one and only personal experience. There was an article recently written in The Boston Globe by Eugene Rivers, a black minister in Roxbury, who said that Boston Police are not Minneapolis police, and we should be wise to remember that.

- a Boston Cop

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Voting closed 19

Stopping crime is good and honorable.

Violating people's civil rights is bad and dishonorable.

If you can do the first thing without doing the second thing, great! Stay a cop!

If you can't do the first thing without doing the second thing, the citizens would like to examine alternative candidates.

And if you can do the first thing but are annoyed that you're a position where you're made to look bad by people who do the second thing, or you are asked to cover for them, you might actually benefit from some of your least-stable coworkers find other vocations.

As with other professions (teachers, doctors, lawyers, accountants, etc.), a risk is that you will occasionally be accused of misconduct. Sometimes those accusations are false, but in good faith; sometimes they're just in bad faith; occasionally you might make a mistake. It's very stressful to be accused, falsely or truthfully (in different ways). But most other jobs don't come with the protections, pay, and benefits yours does.

If you think you can do a good job--can serve and protect--we still need good cops.

I've been at a bunch of these protests; I think policing needs some reform. To be fair: I think other professions do, too. Got lots of complaints about how doctors practice (and bill); how teaching works (or doesn't), etc. Turns out American institutions are... mostly not doing so great.

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Voting closed 14

I haven't seen too many details so I could be wrong but it seems pretty far short of what's needed and demanded by the public. Qualified Immunity is largely unchanged. Nothing to make it easier for the public to see the complaints or records of officers or make it easier to fire bad cops. Nothing which reduces the extremely strong police unions that remain one of the biggest impediments to change.

The Boston police contract is up for renewal. Walsh won't talk about it so you know he's not asking for much in the way of changes. In my town of Medford, a whopping 25% of the force lied about OT and can't be trusted to testify in court yet these officers are still on the force. Same goes for the State Police who continue to be untouchable.

Changing nothing and just hoping things improve has never worked.

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Voting closed 53

I don't know the answer to this, so this is more of a question to readers. By clarifying qualified immunity, will police unions seek insurance against it? (like how doctors have malpractice insurance).

If they are able to, will it become a union expense, ultimately passed along to tax payers? And would this, in a way, result in MORE policy funding?

Again, this isn't an opinion statement - I'm asking a question that I'm hoping a reader will know the answer to.

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Voting closed 13

Profiles in courage for all of them? Wow.

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They were in session for 14 hours...

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They did it without getting triple overtime while still asleep at home.

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Or unnecessary details companies are forced to pay for, 14 hour sessions and 4 in the morning votes shows us the politicians are just as screwed up as the Police.

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8 murders in 10 days and this is what we get.

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"so how dare you make any attempt to change it?"

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Voting closed 27

crime always spikes in warm weather.

throw in anxiety of living under COVID for 4 months.

throw in social unrest on pretty much every possible level.

but sure, crime is surging because the police are being criticized & their future budgets are being examined.

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Voting closed 13