Hey, there! Log in / Register

Methadone Mile murder suspect has long criminal history - and had a young son who died in an accidental shooting

When BPD detectives went to arrest Liquarry Jefferson for the fatal Methadone Mile stabbing of Jamaal Chin-Clark on Feb. 27, they knew right where to go - Jefferson was already being held on a probation violation related to his 2015 conviction for the armed robbery of a Roxbury market.

That conviction - which brought a seven-year sentence and which came after he pleaded guilty in the middle of his trial - came after his 2008 arrest for a pair of armed convenience store robberies.

And that was one year after his 8-year-old son, also named Liquarry Jefferson, was fatally, and accidentally, shot in his Grove Hall apartment by his cousin, who found a loaded gun in a dresser drawer, possibly left by Liquarry's half brother. The brother pleaded guilty to involuntary slaughter, the mother was acquitted on the same charge when she came to trial.

Jefferson had nothing to do with that incident; in fact, he had been charged with beating the boy's mother in the face with a barbell and belt when she was two months' pregnant with him - a couple months after she allegedly stabbed Jefferson in the stomach and attacked his former girlfriend when she found the two in Jefferson's apartment.

Jefferson, who grew up in Dorchester but whose last address was in Taunton, also has a manslaughter conviction for a 1997 incident in which he and another man broke into a Castlegate Road apartment and beat and stabbed the occupant to death.

The DA's office provide this account of Jefferson's alleged fatal stabbing of Jamaal Chin-Clarke early on Feb. 27 - which says the stabbing actually happened on Southampton Street, rather than at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Melnea Cass Boulevard:

Assistant District Attorney David McGowan told the court that surveillance camera footage captured the victim and a second individual walking on foot to a Southampton Street parking lot on the morning of February 27, 2021. Approximately 20 minutes later, a vehicle driven by an individual later identified as Mr. Jefferson arrived at the location. Mr. Jefferson, the victim and the second individual are seen on camera in what is believed to be a hand-to-hand drug transaction. During the interaction, Mr. Jefferson allegedly punched the victim in the face, knocked the second individual to the ground, and stabbed the victim in the chest and torso. Mr. Jefferson then returned to his vehicle and drove away.

Mr. Chin-Clarke walked toward the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Melnea Cass Boulevard, where he collapsed in the street. He was transported to Boston Medical Center, where he died of his injuries.

Innocent, etc.

Neighborhoods: 
Topics: 
Free tagging: 

Ad:

Comments

Who could have predicted that someone who already stabbed someone to death would be the type of person who would stab someone to death?!

up
Voting closed 66

What the hell is wrong with us that we fill our jails with people whose only crime was dealing weed while Black, but allow animals like this the freedom to walk among us?

up
Voting closed 19

We don’t fill our jails with weed dealers.

up
Voting closed 68

only about 6% of inmates in DOC custody are there for a drug offense

https://www.mass.gov/service-details/quick-statistics

It is sad that some people are as misinformed as you are, when there are easily available statistics.

up
Voting closed 59

47% of Federal prison inmates have a drug offense as their most serious conviction

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States

up
Voting closed 14

Only 10% of prisoners are in federal custody (per the page you reference,) so in this case we are still talking about 5% of all those incarcerated.

Also, less than half of all federal prisoners are doing time for drugs offenses, and to be honest, I'm okay with people trafficking meth, opiates, and cocaine doing federal time.

up
Voting closed 20

the longer view. Papa Bush's War on Drugs, which several subsequent presidents (D and R alike) continued, imprisoned tens of thousands, maybe hundreds, on pot possession offenses that our more enlightened present mostly deems trivial.

A former colleague of mine often mourned the fate of a friend of hers who was serving a 20-year stretch for being caught in his home with a few pot plants. The prosecution made its case not on the amount of weed actually found, but the potential yield of the plants over their theoretical lifetime. For weed! Dude didn't even deal. What a misguided, horrifically costly, destructive policy.

It occurred to me that it was designed merely to enrich our leaders' friends in the private prison industry, protect the profits of their friends in the alcohol-dealing business, and score cheap political points with elderly and middle-aged ignoramuses exposed to "Reefer Madness" in their distant youth. That's a 1930s-vintage propaganda film with Ed-Wood-level production values and acting in which the green scourge, addictive as heroin, makes you do a hit-and-run with your car, impulsively murder a friend, commit suicide, attempt rape, suffer scary hallucinations, and/or go stark raving mad. It's so awful, it's not even funny as camp, but I suspect it warped the perceptions of pot for a lot of people of my parents' and grandparents' generations.

(Barely-related anecdote: my own parents were basically against it for their kids, and then as an undergraduate I accompanied them to a neighbor's Christmas party where their similarly middle-aged friends / hosts broke out joints for the olds to partake in, which to my shock my peer-pressured parents did. For the record, I now believe nobody should ever have to see their parents get high for the first time. Lightly scarring.)

I always supported legalization without being a particular fan of the drug -- my stoner buds never got into lunkheaded brawls the way my boozing pals did. Alcohol killed several of my close childhood friends: one got murdered in the wake of a drunken bar fight over a girl (he won the fistfight, lost the one-sided gun battle afterward), and three others died in alcohol-influenced car accidents, all before they hit 23. So I remain surprised and nonplussed that we managed to move forward without a reliable roadside test for driving while high: my one remaining qualm about wider legal use. It's as reckless as driving drunk, in my view, and those senseless deaths -- the lives my hilarious, solid, vibrant high-school besties might have lived -- have never been far from my thoughts for decades.

I never thought I'd see our current progress on the maryjane in my lifetime, though I'd have settled for its legalized use for medical purposes, which has relieved the terrible, once-persistent suffering of many people I know -- chemotherapy without it can be utter hell, for one example. I guess it's one small thing to feel good about in our otherwise benighted century.

up
Voting closed 33

It occurred to me that it was designed merely to enrich our leaders' friends in the private prison industry, protect the profits of their friends in the alcohol-dealing business, and score cheap political points with elderly and middle-aged ignoramuses exposed to "Reefer Madness" in their distant youth.

The war on drugs was/is all about "drugs are evil and bad for society." No one is trying to build up the inmate count at private prisons, nor to support the alcohol industry. The fact that pot has been treated like it's a "hard drug" shows that the people in power couldn't differentiate between a fairly benign substance that makes the user feel good and physically addictive drugs that can kill you.

up
Voting closed 14

The war on drugs was/is all about "drugs are evil and bad for society."

You should really look up the history of the war on drugs. It was very directly intended as a way for politicians to be able to target minorities and the Left without seeming to do so.

The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I'm saying? We knew we couldn't make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
— John Ehrlichman, former Nixon aide, interview with Dan Baum

I'd also highly recommend looking up the history of private prisons and incarceration rates, and particularly, the amount of lobbying done by corporations that run private prisons. They're very willing to admit publicly that their income depends on increasing crime rates - and the easiest way to do that is to increase the number of things that are crimes and get higher sentences put in place for those crimes.

up
Voting closed 23

The war on drugs was/is all about "drugs are evil and bad for society.

That’s not what Erlichman said...

https://www.businessinsider.com/nixon-adviser-ehrlichman-anti-left-anti-...

up
Voting closed 19

That's a pretty naive and incorrect view of the history of the war on drugs. Here's a direct quote from Nixon's domestic policy advisor John Ehrlichman:

“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

Source:
https://harpers.org/archive/2016/04/legalize-it-all/

up
Voting closed 19

Poor kid never had a chance.

up
Voting closed 16

then i saw the little guys pic and remembered that awful story.

up
Voting closed 12

Curious standard Dorchester city has for a manslaughter.

broke into a Castlegate Road apartment and beat and stabbed the occupant to death.

up
Voting closed 16

Dorchester is not a city, not a jurisdiction, and has no legal standard for anything. Stick to your area of expertise, maybe?

up
Voting closed 28