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Law student who doesn't want to get a Covid-19 shot sues his school, which says he has to

Update: Judge dismisses suit.

A student at New England Law says the school's policy that his attendance this fall is conditional on his showing proof of Covid-19 vaccination violates the "unconditional" scholarship he says he was awarded, so he's suing.

In his suit against the school and its president, Scott Brown, George Artem says Covid-19 shots are "experimental" and dangerous and he's just not going to put up with it. The school also requires proof of vaccination against tetanus, diphtheria, measles, mumps, rubella and hepatitis-B; Artem did not raise those in his complaint, which he filed himself yesterday in US District Court in Boston.

In the complaint, Artem asks a judge to either force the school to stop the alleged nonsense or, in the alternative, pay him the full value of the scholarship he won, the costs of his moving cross country to attend a school in Boston and the lost income he otherwise make with a JD from New England Law.

In addition to attending law school, Artem also got a job with the state Executive Office of Health and Human Services and runs a Web site that sells stuff in the electronic currency Dogecoin.

Artem's complaint does not cite any specific federal laws or regulations that would bar the school from requiring proof of Covid-19 vaccinations for continued attendance. Instead, he simply states the policy is "discriminatory."

He writes that on May 14, he requested "ethical, philosophical or religious exemptions" to getting a Covid-19 shot.

Artem says that on June 1, he wrote the school, urging it "affirmatively advise students of their rights to refuse emergency use authorized mRNA Sars-COV-2, COVID-19 experimental injections and any additional experimental treatments or devices."

After not hearing back from the school after two entire days, Artem wrote officials again. No replay. On June 7, he tried again, this time alerting them to alleged side effects of Covid-19 shots, including "reproductive and autoimmune risks and spike toxicity" and again urging them to ditch the requirement.

With no answer, Artem called up his word-processing program and composed his formal legal complaint, which he then filed in court.

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Comments

Methinks he's about to learn a lesson in why he's still a student at the law school.

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Like I've said before... we've got a whole lot of winners on scholarship at our school.

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...affirmatively advise students of their rights to refuse emergency use authorized mRNA Sars-COV-2, COVID-19 experimental injections...

Luckily, the viral vector J&J vaccine is available too!

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They magnetize you, turn you into a 5G hot spot, and Bill Gates will always know where to find you!

(Though I haven't figured out what's wrong about not having to find a pocket for your keys, always having great cell phone receptions, and having tech support follow you around all the time...)

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....always having great cell phone receptions...

IDK about that:

5G Range

The trade-off for speed at mmWave frequencies is limited range. Testing of 5G service range in mmWave has produced results approximately 500 meters from the tower, meaning a huge propagation of MIMO-enabled antenna arrays would be required for pure standalone 5G deployment. In addition, the inability of millimeter wave signals to penetrate obstructions further limits the range potential because these obstructions would need to be factored into network designs for mobile users.

We may be about to see a massive proliferation of cell towers.

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All those vaccinated cell phone towers walking around!

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I've been fully vaccinated for two months now and dammit I want my magnetic forehead!

Especially now that I'm leaving the house more often and thus need to lock up. That would be soooooo handy!

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those other vaccines are fully approved, whereas the Covid-19 vaccines are "merely" approved for emergency use.

Whether or not the courts find that a distinction with a difference, we shall soon see.

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from a quick poke around the web it sounds like they have a relaxed standard of *efficacy*, not *safety*, in comparison to full approval.

If that's the case, then yeah, he doesn't really have a leg to stand on here.

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Massachusetts required vaccinations to start school since the 1960s. Why would we stop now?

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Because we've never given experimental mRNA vaccines to humans before and there is data that they hurt young people.

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/06/10/covid-vaccine-cdc-says-heart-inflammatio...

I spent 3 days in the hospital after my second dose, and I am a young healthy male (a few years older than the age group the CDC is reporting on).

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Voting closed 40

You're not a participant in a phase trial. They did all their experiments on human adults already. They submitted an application for emergency use due to the humanitarian need of having a vaccine for a deadly virus. They got approval. We HAVE given mRNA vaccines to humans before. It's the evidence on which they were able to get approval.

Why did you spend 3 days in the hospital? Break your arm?

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Luckily they are quite rare - far more rare than the risks of COVID infection, even in young healthy people.

Like orders of magnitude more rare.

I know a couple of people who want to be vaccinated, but have a documented history of anaphylaxis. One took her parents to get their shots, but the centers refused to give her one. People like her should get a pass. The rest are just statistically impaired morons with a very weak grounding in science and need to either get the vaccination or take the consequences.

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New England Law isn't specifying an mRNA vaccine, if that's his concern. He can get the J&J vaccine, which uses a modified adenovirus.

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These too can cause blood clots and have been linked to death. Remember they halted them for a while? I am not an anti-vaxer, I obviously got vaccinated, but don't pretend they are without risk.

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However, you are pretending that the risks of vaccines - some not even established as being attributable to vaccination due to their extreme rarity - are significant.

They are not.

Even the healthiest people are felled by COVID at rates vastly higher than the miniscule risks of vaccination.

I suggest that you review that math lesson from high school on orders of magnitude and what they mean.

IMAGE(https://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/news/2021/04_2021/coronavirus_blood_clot_graphic/1800x1200_coronavirus_blood_clot_graphic.jpg?resize=650:*/img])

So many zeros, so little time.

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These too can cause blood clots and have been linked to death.

You know what really causes blood clots and is linked to death?

Covid.

(preaching to the choir, I know...)

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because it was still below the base rate. But even if they were a different kind, or more serious, the cases of concern were all in young women -- so probably nothing of concern for this fellow.

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It was not a significant risk, but it's still an increased risk for a type of clotting that doesn't behave like the usual clotting one might have problems with. The bigger danger there is that if treated like common clotting issues, it can exacerbate the situation while simultaneously not solving it which led to worse outcomes.

Some scientists in Germany have recently hypothesized what the issue is with the J&J and AZ vaccines to cause the clotting. They have some interesting initial discoveries that may lead to a solution (and supposedly J&J is working with their findings to see if it leads to better outcomes).

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The tone of this read as if the student is wrong, or dumb, or both. He is not. You have the right to get the vaccine if you want it, but also to not get it if you don’t want. And you shouldn’t be made to feel ostracized because of it.

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Just because you have the right to do something doesn't mean you're smart for doing it, or that you shouldn't be mocked mercilessly by the rest of society.

Anyway, based on his "legal" argument, it's pretty clear he's a huge dumbass.

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Doesn’t affect me therefor I don’t give a shit. It’s between him and the school. He’s not preventing me from getting a shot ( or anyone else)

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Of course he has the right to not get a shot. And he gets to deal with the ramifications of that decision.

I remember my second semester freshman year of college, we were not allowed to complete registration unless we had proof of a measles shot, or got one right there in the gym. That was that.

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My son was told that he was not allowed back on campus in January without a meningitis shot.

The only reason he had to delay (and got a reprieve on getting it) was a bad case of mono at thanksgiving. He marched his collegiate arse over to the medical center the first day he was eligible and got it done.

Like grownups do.

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He is both wrong and dumb. You can tell he is because he comes out and tells you he is in his complaint. We should totally ostracize wrong and dumb people who upon being told their wrong and dumb continue to be wrong and dumb. Elevating them to not being wrong and dumb is counter-productive. At least ostracizing them might give them time to think about how wrong and dumb they are.

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Take a shit you’ll
Feel better

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Kaz, I don't know why you are so angry. Consider all facts. This is science. There is more than enough data to prove he is not "dumb", including New York Times and CNBC articles on adverse effects and statements from the CDC themselves. Just because you don't agree with him or have "alternative facts", that does not make him "dumb". I am not an anti-vaxer, I am pro vaccines, but don't pretend there are no risks or that people who don't get them are "dumb".

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We might not be in this antivax situation we're in now if we hadn't insisted that the dumbest idiots in the country wear seatbelts for the last 30 years

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Who don't get vaccinated.

Can the vaccine hurt you? Maybe. But COVID is far more likely to hurt or kill you, at all age groups than the vaccine.

Not taking the vaccine is stupid, and people should be shunned.

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You have the right to get the vaccine if you want it, but also to not get it if you don’t want.

Similarly, a school has the well established right to protect the other students by making immunization a condition of attendance.

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Appropriate restrictions on the behavior of irrational and foolish people who refuse to take the most definitive actions available to them to prevent this plague from rearing its ugly head in our quarters again.

Don't want a vaccine? Face the consequences of being unvaccinated. I honestly think you should be surcharged on your health insurance to cover the cost of the willful assumption of stupid risks unless you have a documented history of anaphylaxis.

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.

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And you shouldn’t be made to feel ostracized because of it.

I don't give a fart in a high wind how he feels, and I have nothing but contempt for those who use the specious argument that someone is "made to feel" bad when they behave in a selfish, antisocial manner. Feel ostracized? To hell with that, if it's up to me he will BE ostracized. He can then feel whatever he wants in the isolated privacy of his own home.

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Short of the sanctions of law, social pressure is how societies control antisocial behavior. Because an act is legal does not necessarily mean it's OK. Sometimes social pressure is misapplied to people acting in a harmless fashion, and the student here is claiming to be such a person. En Discouraging vaccination in a pandemic is not harmless. I would shun him.

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...but otherwise agree.

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Edited

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What are the career prospects for a future lawyer who lost a lawsuit against the law school they attended?

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There are special places for special people if he manages to graduate - like CPAC and the Grim Obsolete Party.

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Anyone else deeply disturbed that Artem is working at "the state Executive Office of Health and Human Services"?

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Who likely hired him?

Grifters are thick as thieves.

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200 YEARS OF CASE LAW SAY BZZZZZTTTTT!!!!!!

Yep, our "law student" should go research it. Pandemics and epidemics ARE NOT A NEW THING. The country was single digit years old when there was a horrible yellow fever pandemic. Case law accumulated from there on quarantines, travel restrictions, mask mandates, shut downs and, yes, vaccines and court-mandated treatment.

Any law student who doesn't know this should be fully capable of researching this. Being a law student isn't about filing petulant lawsuits - it should be about LEARNING HOW THE LAW WORKS.

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The Washington Post reports a federal judge in Texas has thrown out a lawsuit by hospital workers who didn't want to get a shot, in part because it's "experimental."

Basically, the judge said they had that right to refuse the shot. But the hospital also has the right to make a shot a condition of continued employment, so the workers lose and he dismissed the case.

In his ruling, [the judge] said the lawsuit’s claim that the vaccines are experimental and dangerous “is false, and it is also irrelevant.” The hospital system’s requirement does not violate state or federal law or public policy, he wrote.

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